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Brian Kaney

Research Scientist

My two core areas of special expertise would be physics/physical science teaching at the undergraduate college level and web application development. I have been an avid weather watcher and severe storm enthusiast since childhood. My higher education was in Physics. But, I tend toward being more of a generalist rather than taking a deep dive in a narrow topic and enjoy finding ways to explain complex subjects in simple or novel ways, hence the draw to undergraduate teaching. As the internet developed during my early career period I became interested in the visual display of complex data, data animation, data mining and the programming skills needed to support these. I began working part-time for a group at the National Severe Storms Lab. First I looked at effects of summer monsoon thunderstorm outflow and precipitation on power consumption for the greater Phoenix area. Later I looked at patterns of summer lightning over the Southwest mountain states versus terrain. I gradually grew my second core area of expertise, that of web development. I have authored many web applications, from simple viewers to complex tool kits, used to advance numerous projects within our group. My tools have supported development of the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor [MRMS] product suite. The behavior, assimilation and comparison with radar techniques of national automated precipitation gauge data have been a major area of focus. We have also done a lot of work for the Radar Operations Center including the Radar Reflectivity Comparison Tool [RRCT] and numerous monitoring tools for the Dual Pol upgrade.

Education

Ph.D. Physics, Arizona State University, 1988

B.S Physics, Arizona State University, 1984

Experience

Research Scientist, CIWRO, Norman, OK (2009-Present)

Summer Researcher/Part-Time Contractor, NSSL, Norman, OK (1991-2009)

Professor of Physics, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK (1988-2009)

Research Team(s):

Applied Computing for the Meteorological Enterprise