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Thomas Jones

Research Scientist III

Dr. Jones was hired as a research scientist in September 2010 by the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies in Norman, OK to study the effects of assimilating various forms of satellite data into storm-scale numerical weather prediction models using an Ensemble Kalman Filter technique as part of the Warn-on-Forecast (WoF) group. Ongoing research has focused primarily on two types of satellite observations. First, polar orbiting hyperspectral sounders provide information on the vertical profile of temperature and humidity in clear-sky conditions. Dr. Jones has conducted both real and synthetic data studies and determine that they can have a large impact on forecasts of significant weather events. Secondly, geostationary satellite such as GOES provide visible and infrared radiances at high temporal and spatial resolution making them ideal for WoF applications. In particular, assimilating retrieved of cloud properties (e.g. water path, cloud heights, phase) has led to a significant improvement the characterization of clouds during high impact weather events. As a result, assimilation of cloudy retrievals is now fully implemented in the latest WoF ensemble data assimilation system used for real-time testing in the Hazardous Weather Testbed. Additional research is underway to study the impacts of assimilating GOES Advanced Baseline Imager water vapor brightness temperatures and atmospheric motion vectors into storm-scale modeling environments.

Education

University of Alabama in Huntsville Atmospheric Science Ph.D. 2006

University of Oklahoma Meteorology M.S. 2002

University of Oklahoma Meteorology B.S. 2000

Experience

Adjunct Lecturer, OU, 2014 Present

Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, 2010 Present

Affiliate Graduate Faculty Member UAH, 2008 2010

Research Associate, UAH, 2006 2010

Research Team(s):

Forecast Modelling, Satellite Data Assimilation and Microphysics